Slayer Farewell Pittsburgh.

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Slayer Farewell Pittsburgh.

Post by Tymaster » Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:09 pm

This a great bill, basically Slayer are taking their own festival out with them. We arrived at the venue right at 4:00, the gates were open but many people were still tailgating. Kudos to Key Bank Pavilion for still allowing that. Riverbend and Blossom would arrest you for having the temerity to grill you own food and drink your own beer! That's lost revenue :lol: . I'm pretty sure Key Bank, most of you probably know it as Star Lake, has a group of Eastern Ohio/West Virginia/Western Pennsylvanian hillbilly rednecks that have never actually entered the venue proper but instead choose to sit outside and "party" all night and that's ok. The place has a cool vibe. We had 8 of us, with 4 pairs of tickets, so once everyone figured out where everyone was we settled in and got ready for the show. The PA went from whatever was playing to a much, much louder "Master of Puppets" signaling that Testament were on the way out at about 4:55 and they were onstage at 5:00. I've been a Testament fan since forever ago but was in Junior High when they came through opening big arena and shed tours for Priest and Maiden, ergo this was my first time seeing Testament in this size venue with this size production. That alone made me happy but it was kind of depressing watching what is basically a metal supergroup come out to a few dozen bodies at 5:00. Credit where credit is due, they have more than 30 years in and are total pros and if their job was to get asses out of the lot and into the venue and get the people in the venue fired up, they did it well. I noticed a lot of people who seemed shocked that there was a band playing at 5:00 and even more shocked that it was Testament and not Behemoth. No pity here. The ticket clearly stated that show began at 5, the venue had posted the stage times on their website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snap Chat within 24 hours and this tour has been on the road for several weeks. In 2018 if you don't know who is playing when you're not paying attention. By the time Testament wrapped up their quick 7 song set, the place was getting relatively full. There were already more bodies in the place than there were for Slayer and King Diamond on that 2015 fiasco! Testament aren't shy about playing newish material but I thought there were some odd choices early in the setlist considering they only had 7 songs to play.
Behemoth was up next. Totally not my thing but they’re good at their craft and they had some fans who were really into them scattered throughout. At 6:55 it was time for Anthrax. By this time the pavilion was about 90% full giving it the ol' eyeball test and the lawn was starting to pack as well. I've seen Anthrax about 40 or so times but I've only seen them open for a few bands over the years so even I was taken aback and impressed with how well they went over. They had that entire place rocking. Quick set, but just extremely well paced 7 song set. Other than "Evil Twin" it was classic material that everyone knew and they had nice pits down in the GA section and up in the lawn.
Lamb of God were the penultimate act. Again, like Behemoth, not my thing but LoG are clearly at a level of headlining some pretty big places on their own. Slayer gave them ample room for a pretty good stage show they played about 9 songs in a close to an hour set and by this time the crowd was either 100% into LoG or restlessly pounding beers waiting for their headlining heroes.
Slayer were Slayer. This is a good thing and a bad thing. The setlist is pretty close to what they were doing in 2015-2017 although it's more of "greatest hits" set list now with material from the EP, a surprise mid 90's song, and stuff all the way through to the latest record. The major difference between this and any other Slayer show was intensity.. Both from the band and the crowd. You have Slayer filling up a venue 3 times the size of where they usually play in most cities and damn near selling it out. Then somehow manage to have 99% of that crowd knowing every word to every song. Where did these people come from? LOL. Post Gazette reported 12,000 tickets. Again, I think the Rockstar Mayhem Festival of 2015 drew about 3,000 and that's being generous... And where as Slayer can sometimes seem like they were sleepwalking through their setlist after doing this for 37 years, they seem to be enjoying every second of this tour. Every time the spotlight was on Tom alone as he addressed the crowd, it was deep. Slayer fans love Mr. Araya. At the end of the show he just stands there for nearly 3:00 minutes while the other three are giving out picks and sticks, Tom was just taking it all in before giving a heartfelt goodbye. If this is truly it, Slayer went out on a high note. If you're a metal fan and a Slayer fan, there is truly no reason to miss this tour.

http://www.post-gazette.com/ae/music/20 ... 1806100122

Is this really the end of Slayer? Thrash band crushes at KeyBank
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette logo
SCOTT MERVIS
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
[email protected]
JUN 10, 2018 11:04 AM
They came en masse and wore the appropriate black for the last rites.

Metal fans from near and far descended on KeyBank Pavilion Saturday, about 12,000 strong, to pay their last respects to Slayer, commonly pronounced as “SLAAAAY-ERRRR!”

“They helped invent the music that we and other bands play,” Lamb of God singer Randy Blythe stated during its opening set. When one of the LoG guitarists played the opening to “South of Heaven,” Blythe added that the deadly riff “makes me want to go kill a chicken or some s--t.”

Slayer
Slayer
(Mike Papariella)
It was probably for the best that all the chickens were already in the concession stands. After all, there were plenty of children in attendance with their metal-loving parents (I saw one teaching her two young boys to mosh, a safe distance from the violent circle pit on the lawn).


Twins Alexandra Belzie, left, and Alissa Belzie of Long Island, N.Y., take a selfie underneath the Umbrella Sky Project during the opening day of the Three Rivers Arts Festival on Friday, June 2, 2017, Downtown. The Umbrella Sky Project originated in Agueda, Portugal, as a way to create shade and keep people cool during the summer, said Alexandra Guedes, a designer with the Umbrella Sky Project.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Looking for summer plans in Pittsburgh? We have you covered for (almost) everything.
The End of Days, announced in January with little explanation other than it being the farewell tour, was a full buffet of metal beginning with fellow California thrash veterans Testament blitzing through ‘80s fare like “Over the Wall” and adding new songs from “Brotherhood of the Snake.” Polish extreme metal band Behemoth added some horror to the afternoon with demon costumes, monster vocals and such occult fare as “O Father O Satan O Sun!”

Anthrax, one of the Big Four thrash bands with Slayer, came with four of the five ‘80s members and lived up to that billing with a relentless seven-song set that opened with “Caught in a Mosh” and mixed their covers of Joe Jackson’s “Got the Time” and French band Trust’s “Antisocial” with the vintage “I Am the Law” and new entry “Evil Twin.”

Lamb of God, the pride of Richmond, vaulted the show back into dark, heavy mode with a sludgier sound and Blythe’s growling vocals and tortured lyrics, starting with the murderous “Omerta” and moving through “Walk With Me in Hell” (dedicated to Pittsburgh’s Code Orange), prison song “512” and a climax of “Redneck.”

There was no question who ruled the evening. Despite all the mileage on them over 37 hard years, Slayer looks nothing like a band on its last legs.

They made a statement, hitting the stage with their newest material, 2015’s “Repentless,” on the way to revisiting 10 of their 12 albums (all but the ‘90s offerings “Undisputed Attitude” and “Diabolus in Musica”).

Song after song began with an iconic or killer riff before the time signature shifted for bassist Tom Araya to rush through the hellish, harrowing, dystopian lyrics of Jeff Hanneman, who left us in 2013. With Paul Bostaph driving the works and the stage ablaze with more fire than any other band has employed, the songs ultimately came down to lightning-fast solos from Kerry King (tattooed, muscled and wearing a Slayer shirt) and Gary Holt, sporting an Exodus wristband “Kill the Kardashians” T-shirt. They are without doubt two of the busiest guitarists you’ll ever see on a stage.

After informing us that “god hates us all” (“Disciple”) and vividly depicting the ravages of war (“Mandatory Suicide,” “War Ensemble,” etc.), Araya stopped to ask, in his soft-spoken manner, “Are you guys having a good time … making some lasting memories?”

Just about everyone seemed to agree that we were, so Slayer raged on even harder, stacking the biggies at the end of the set with a run that included “Seasons in the Abyss,” “Dead Skin Mask,” “South of Heaven” and “Raining Blood.”

Crashing to a finish with “Angel of Death,” Slayer sent its faithful to the parking lots properly pummeled one last time.

Araya, the oldest member, is only 57 -- a mere babe in classic-rock years — so it’s entirely possible we haven’t really, really seen the last of Slayer. The band has new music on the way, so it remains to be seen if this is just farewell … for now.

Scott Mervis: [email protected].
Last edited by Tymaster on Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Slayer Farewell Pittsburgh.

Post by Psychobolia.com » Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:42 am

Tymaster wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:09 pm

Araya, the oldest member, is only 57 -- a mere babe in classic-rock years — so it’s entirely possible we haven’t really, really seen the last of Slayer. The band has new music on the way, so it remains to be seen if this is just farewell … for now.

Scott Mervis: [email protected].
Cool review!

Af for the Gazette review: not sure where he heard Slayer is going to put out new music, that's the first I've heard of that...
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Re: Slayer Farewell Pittsburgh.

Post by Tymaster » Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:27 am

Psychobolia.com wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:42 am
Tymaster wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:09 pm

Araya, the oldest member, is only 57 -- a mere babe in classic-rock years — so it’s entirely possible we haven’t really, really seen the last of Slayer. The band has new music on the way, so it remains to be seen if this is just farewell … for now.

Scott Mervis: [email protected].
Cool review!

Af for the Gazette review: not sure where he heard Slayer is going to put out new music, that's the first I've heard of that...
Same here but he seemed very, very informed for a mainstream media guy covering a metal show for the Post Gazette. Maybe Tom & Kerry already have stuff in the can?
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Re: Slayer Farewell Pittsburgh.

Post by WOLF » Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:03 am

Was at the show in Montreal (Laval) a couple of weeks ago and LOVED it. Testament, Anthrax, and Slayer were great; Lamb of God OK; skipped Behemoth. Amazing vibe between bands and fans, as well as between bands. You feel the energy. Show runs like clockwork as well. Very impressed.
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Re: Slayer Farewell Pittsburgh.

Post by Tymaster » Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:15 am

WOLF wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:03 am
Was at the show in Montreal (Laval) a couple of weeks ago and LOVED it. Testament, Anthrax, and Slayer were great; Lamb of God OK; skipped Behemoth. Amazing vibe between bands and fans, as well as between bands. You feel the energy. Show runs like clockwork as well. Very impressed.
Yes. The show just had that vibe. It was all positive energy. I felt like a kid again. It’s funny, you and I watched the show the same way. Since we were kind of rushing to see Testament in time, we bailed the second they left to regroup, grab some zesty beverages, check out merchandise, shoot the shit, etc. We were back in our seats for Anthrax and it was impressive how many bodies were there before 7. Slayer was like electric church and saying goodbye to your favorite uncle.
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Re: Slayer Farewell Pittsburgh.

Post by Tymaster » Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:38 am

https://www.firstangelmedia.com/slayer- ... gettstown/
For going on forty years, Slayer have been a living tornado, an unstoppable natural godforce that eviscerates all in its path. No other band has been able to replicate their violent gestalt energy in concert, and all one can do to experience it is to withstand it.

On this, what is purported to be Slayer’s final tour, they brought along pesky New Yorkers Anthrax, Southern axe-murderers Lamb of God, burly California thrashers Testament, and blackened Polish death metal nihilists Behemoth. I had feared at first that these acts were hitched onto the bills to fill venues I felt might have been too large for Slayer. I recalled 2015’s Mayhem Festival stop at what is now called KeyBank Pavilion, an event that drew so poorly, attendees with lawn tickets were forcibly upgraded into the seats. Slayer headlined with King Diamond underneath. 1991’s Clash of the Titans Burgettstown date, at which Slayer also performed last, only saw 5,000 fans come out that day to a venue that holds 23,000.

Days before this festival of sorts, I managed to snag a ticket in the pit at the front of the stage. That there was one available was both exciting and worrisome. As the show rolled on, I would look behind me every so often in the thick of each set only to see more and more bodies in the grass and under the roof and surrounding me.

Someone working a security detail told me that at least 13,000 tickets were sold. I had expected little more than half that figure. I was relieved that Slayer would ride off with dignity.

Nonetheless, the atmosphere was at once both thrilling and somber. Some fans moshed furiously, as if they’d be able to no longer. Others stood with a mixture of reverence and awe knowing that this would never happen again, like it were a meteor shower. Slayer are this galactic giant, the progenitors of a number of metal genres, a branded influence on an uncounted number of musicians. And after the four opening acts fired up the swelling mass of denimed, leathery humanity composed of everyone from Gen Xers to elementary school kids, Slayer would smite our corner of the world one last time below aphotic skies to show us their power. Executioners Kerry King and Gary Holt riddled the air with bullets of sound as flames burst into the air. Paul Bostoph operated the drum kit as if it were a tank and Tom Araya plucked the fat strings with ease, barking tales of war, genocide, self-abuse, death, and insanity at us in an attempt to warn us of man’s evil one more time in vain.

Testament were the first heralds summoned to make way for the grand destroyers. Chuck Billy’s imposing, pro-wrestler presence, signature bearish growl and sawed-off microphone stand with which he mimicked the guitarwork of master bandmates Skolnick and Peterson were a sonic and visual highlight of the set. With drum deity Gene Hoglan slamming the skins, it was almost a demonstration of virtuoso heft as much as it was a stoking of the furnace. Impressive is par for the course when it comes to Testament who aptly connected with the audience.

The frightsome and infamous Behemoth were next. Led by hooded, sepulchral hobgoblin/bass archer Nergal, and backed by a row of Satanic mercenaries, Behemoth acted as harbingers of doom, reapers sowing seed of occult wrath. Seeing them at Ozzfest 2007 made be believe in their infernal grasp of underground metal and their aural spectacle of noir. This was no exception, Behemoth proving themselves to the Celtic Frost of this era with ashen chords and Nergal’s horrifying, possessed snarls.

Subversive, punchy, mighty, Anthrax played their usual role as that of smirking gremlins, lightening the mood with their upbeat, melodic yet muscular jabs, reassuring us in so many words that a metal world without Slayer is possible. As I’ve observed before, Joey Belladonna sings better than he did three decades before, his vocals and overall performance maturing somewhat. Ian, Bello, Benanate, and relative new hire Donais were all in prime form, backing one of the great frontmen with their rippingly warm musicianship.

Lamb of God were the penultimate omen of destruction. Randy Blythe, LoG’s slasher of a vocalist stomped and roared about the stage, his dread flaling about as he successfully riled up the congregation once more, his markmen Adler and Morton sawing through the thick, heavy air as if they were firing sawblades at everyone. Rabid, razor-sharp, righteous, Lamb of God made the mediocre afraid, bidding them beware as they snatched the flag away from lesser bands and declared themselves the new rulers of New American Metal atop a heap of scraps.

I was somewhat disappointed that Slayer didn’t try to fit in a couple more songs, ending their stand more than ten minutes before curfew. Tom Araya said his goodbyes softly, almost apologetically, the impact left in their wake seemingly beyond their control along with their own demise.

Long Live Slayer.

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